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Mondkopf: The Spirit and the Feeling

 
The 23-year-old producer of 'Galaxy of Nowhere', which at its best restores a spiritual intensity to dance music, tells Rockfort where he's coming from.
 
Skateboarding…
 
I was a skateboarder, not the greatest, but anyway it stopped when i began to make music.
 
Teenage tastes…
 
Wu-Tang, Aphex Twin, Phillip Glass, and all that goes with it.
 
Growing up in Toulouse…
 
Very peaceful! You go from the country to the city in two minutes, a lot was happening on a cultural level, and a lot of girls I wished I could go out with.
 
Moving to Paris…
 
At first it was for my studies, and I was curious for fresh things... It's a cliché but it also was where the opportunities were at as well as the people that I'm glad to have met.
 
First steps…
 
Like a lot of the kids of my generation I started experimenting on Ejay software with some friends like we would have checked out a racing videogame.
 
The influence of Eno, Aphex Twin and Modeselektor…
 
Not only for their sounds but also their vision of music.
 
Remixing Johnny Cash
 
I wasn't worried at all because I did it all for myself so there wasn't any challenge in my mind. I just felt that this song had a groove and I had to do something with it.
 
‘Galaxy of Nowhere’…
 
The thing is that when I make a song I already think about the live show and indeed people are often surprised by the physical impact of the songs on a bigger system. But I have totally thought of the album as whole dedicated to home listening.
 
Religion…
 
I like the elevating power of religious music more than a specific religion, I feel concerned by the thematics that are associated to it.
 
Taking the stage…
 
It would say it's rave and emotional. So far I have been preparing each live show just before playing, arranging the structures and the order of the songs, to be able, when on stage, to focus on reprocessing the effects and the whole dynamic. I use Ableton and devices, not a typical loopy/tracky Ableton live set because some of my tracks work like songs and have too many melodies for that, but it's still rather intense/dramatic/physical, and as i'm improving there is more and more room for spontaneity.
 
Live response…
 
It's always a great reward. Depending on the songs, it's headbanging and fists in the air or people dancing the way they usually dance to sensual techno. It's interesting to see that this reaction is pretty much the same everywhere.
 
A different sound…
 
I never tried to stand out, I just make the music that I like to listen to, trying to find my own way.
 
Interview by David McKenna
 
www.myspace.com/mondkopfonthemoon